Nevada’s Governor Vetoes ‘Medicaid for All’ Insurance Plan – WSJ

June 19, 2017

Nevada’s Republican governor vetoed a bill late Friday that would have created the nation’s first “Medicaid for all” insurance offering, a plan that drew widespread attention as states brace for changes in the federal Affordable Care Act.

The bill would have allowed any state resident to buy into Medicaid, the federal-state program for people with low incomes or disabilities. The idea, which its Democratic sponsor said would have created a guaranteed health coverage option that was affordable, has drawn the interest of other liberal-leaning states as congress works to repeal major portions of the Affordable Care Act, including the law’s Medicaid expansion.

Source: Nevada’s Governor Vetoes ‘Medicaid for All’ Insurance Plan – WSJ


The disappearing ACA insurance market – Axios

June 19, 2017

We’ve all heard about the insurers that are pulling out of Affordable Care Act marketplaces, but sometimes you have to see it to really get it. This map is based on data from the Kaiser Family Foundation for the first four years of the ACA marketplaces. You can really see the difference in 2017, when high-profile insurance exits left 21 percent of all ACA customers with only one insurer in their area.

Source: The disappearing ACA insurance market – Axios


How Did Health Care Get to Be Such a Mess? – The New York Times

June 19, 2017

Physicians established a particularly elegant model: the prepaid doctor group. Unlike today’s physician practices, these groups usually staffed a variety of specialists, including general practitioners, surgeons and obstetricians. Patients received integrated care in one location, with group physicians from across specialties meeting regularly to review treatment options for their chronically ill or hard-to-treat patients.

Individuals and families paid a monthly fee, not to an insurance company but directly to the physician group. This system held down costs. Physicians typically earned a base salary plus a percentage of the group’s quarterly profits, so they lacked incentive to either ration care, which would lose them paying patients, or provide unnecessary care.


ObamaCare Watch | Dire Predictions About the Effects of AHCA’s Per Capita Allocations Find No Support in the CMS Data – ObamaCare Watch

June 16, 2017

The American Health Care Act (AHCA) would establish per capita Medicaid allocation levels, beginning in 2020, as part of changes to give states more flexibility and incentives to improve care delivery and costeffectiveness in their Medicaid programs that now cover an estimated 72 million Americans. Although some have suggested that the allocation levels would produce large reductions in federal Medicaid spending, a comparison of projected per capita Medicaid spending under AHCA with baseline projections prepared by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) suggests that these limits would achieve virtually no federal Medicaid savings.

Source: ObamaCare Watch | Dire Predictions About the Effects of AHCA’s Per Capita Allocations Find No Support in the CMS Data – ObamaCare Watch


ObamaCare Watch | Obamacare Is Not Making Healthcare More Affordable – ObamaCare Watch

June 16, 2017

Despite its name and despite some of the more grandiose claims by its supporters, the Affordable Care Act (ACA) is failing to make healthcare costs more affordable.  Indeed, it’s possible that the ACA has achieved less than nothing with respect to health cost affordability — meaning less even than a hypothetical scenario in which it had never been enacted.

Source: ObamaCare Watch | Obamacare Is Not Making Healthcare More Affordable – ObamaCare Watch


An Hour of Running May Add 7 Hours to Your Life – The New York Times

April 13, 2017

an hour of running statistically lengthens life expectancy by seven hours, the researchers report.


Mortality and morbidity in the 21st century | Brookings Institution

March 23, 2017

The combined effect means that mortality rates of whites with no more than a high school degree, which were around 30 percent lower than mortality rates of blacks in 1999, grew to be 30 percent higher than blacks by 2015.

Source: Mortality and morbidity in the 21st century | Brookings Institution