‘My [Electronic] Health Record’ – Cui Bono (for Whose Benefit)? by Danuta Mendelson, Gabrielle Wolf :: SSRN

December 22, 2016

We examine the operation of Australia’s national electronic health records system, known as the “My Health Record system”. Pursuant to the My Health Records Act 2012 (Cth), every 38 seconds new information about Australians is uploaded onto the My Health Record system servers. This information includes diagnostic tests, general practitioners’ clinical notes, referrals to specialists and letters from specialists. Our examination demonstrates that the intentions of successive Australian Governments in enabling the collection of clinical data through the national electronic health records system, go well beyond statutorily articulated reasons (overcoming “the fragmentation of health information”; improving “the availability and quality of health information”; reducing “the occurrence of adverse medical events and the duplication of treatment”; and improving “the coordination and quality of healthcare provided to healthcare recipients by different healthcare providers”). Not only has the system failed to fulfil its statutory objectives, but it permits the wide dissemination of information that historically has been confined to the therapeutic relationship between patient and health practitioner. After considering several other purposes for which the system is apparently designed, and who stands to benefit from it, we conclude that the government risks losing the trust of Australians in its electronic health care policies unless it reveals all of its objectives and obtains patients’ consent to the use and disclosure of their information.

Source: ‘My [Electronic] Health Record’ – Cui Bono (for Whose Benefit)? by Danuta Mendelson, Gabrielle Wolf :: SSRN


Health Care Quality Reporting: A Failed Form of Mandated Disclosure? by Kristin M. Madison :: SSRN

December 22, 2016

The recently published book by Professors Omri Ben-Shahar and Carl E. Schneider, More Than You Wanted to Know: The Failure of Mandated Disclosure, imparts valuable lessons and offers food for thought for “disclosurites” of all sorts. The book’s sensible arguments and voluminous evidence cutting across a broad range of regulatory areas should lead readers to question the advisability of mandated disclosure as a regulatory strategy. At the same time, however, the broad sweep of their work constrains their ability to offer comprehensive assessments of the advisability of particular disclosure policies, leaving readers to wonder whether there are exceptions to the authors’ general claim, and if so, what form they might take.

In this essay, I explore the possibility that quality reporting might be just such an exception. While quality reporting suffers from many of the problems that Ben-Shahar and Schneider have identified, evidence suggests quality reporting can make a difference. But assessing the net impact of quality reporting is no easy task. The policy objectives underlying governmental quality reporting initiatives are significantly broader than the goal at the heart of Ben-Shahar’s and Schneider’s analysis, complicating efforts to assess the initiatives’ success. The initiatives’ costs are also challenging to evaluate, in part because they support not just public reporting, but also other benefit-producing activities. After discussing these and other complexities that highlight the limits of Ben-Shahar’s and Schneider’s analysis, the essay calls for the development of a framework that lays out key characteristics of disclosure mandates and the environments in which they operate, so that we can develop a better understanding of the characteristics associated with mandate success.

Source: Health Care Quality Reporting: A Failed Form of Mandated Disclosure? by Kristin M. Madison :: SSRN


Regulation of Price Increases by David B. Ridley, Su Zhang :: SSRN

December 22, 2016

U.S. federal and state governments rarely regulate healthcare price levels, but do regulate price changes for pharmaceuticals, hospitals, and health insurance. Previous research showed that limiting price increases can raise launch prices and reduce both profit and social welfare, assuming consumers are myopic. We show that with forward-looking consumers, limiting price increases can have the opposite effect, that is, launch prices fall while profit and social welfare rise. Ironically, inflation regulation can cause inflation to rise, but only because firms are reducing launch prices to make the regulation bind and credibly commit to future prices.

Source: Regulation of Price Increases by David B. Ridley, Su Zhang :: SSRN


Does Health it Adoption Lead to Better Information or Worse Incentives? by Gautam Gowrisankaran, Keith A. Joiner, Jianjing Lin :: SSRN

December 13, 2016

We evaluate whether hospital adoption of electronic medical records (EMRs) leads to increases in billing where financial gains are large or where hassle costs of complete coding are low. The 2007 Medicare payment reform varied both financial incentives and hassle costs of coding. We find no significant impact of financial incentives on billing levels, inconsistent with bill inflation. However, the reform led to increases in reported severity for medical relative to surgical patients at EMR hospitals, consistent with EMRs decreasing coding costs for medical patients. Greater post-reform completeness of coding with EMRs may increase Medicare costs by $689.6 million annually.

Source: Does Health it Adoption Lead to Better Information or Worse Incentives? by Gautam Gowrisankaran, Keith A. Joiner, Jianjing Lin :: SSRN


Geographical Distribution of Emergency Department Closures and Consequences on Heart Attack Patients by Yu-Chu Shen, Renee Hsia :: SSRN

December 10, 2016

We develop a conceptual framework and empirically investigate how a permanent emergency department (ED) closure affects patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). We first document that large increases in driving time to closest ED are more likely to happen in low-income communities and communities that had fewer medical resources at baseline. Then using a difference-in-differences design, we estimate the effect of an ED closure on access to cardiac care technology, treatment, and health outcomes among Medicare patients with AMI who lived in 24,567 ZIP codes that experienced no change, an increase of <10 minutes, 10 to <30 minutes, and ≥30 minutes in driving time to their closest ED. Overall, access to cardiac care declined in all communities experiencing a closure, with access to a coronary care unit decreasing by 18.64 percentage points (95% CI -30.15, -7.12) for those experiencing ≥30-minute increase in driving time. Even after controlling for access to technology and treatment, patients with the longest delays experienced a 6.58 (95% CI 2.49, 10.68) and 6.52 (95% CI 1.69, 11.35) percentage point increase in 90-day and 1-year mortality, respectively, compared with those not experiencing changes in distance. Our results also suggest that the predominant mechanism behind the mortality increase appeared to be time delay as opposed to availability of specialized cardiac treatment.

Source: Geographical Distribution of Emergency Department Closures and Consequences on Heart Attack Patients by Yu-Chu Shen, Renee Hsia :: SSRN


Do Good Reports Mean Higher Prices? The Impact of Hospital Compare Ratings on Cardiac Pricing by Avi Dor, William E. Encinosa, Kathleen Carey :: SSRN

December 9, 2016

Previous research found that the initiation of Hospital Compare (HC) quality reporting had little impact on patient outcomes. However little is known about its impact on hospital prices, which may be significant since insurers are positioned to respond to quality information when engaging hospitals in price negotiations. To explore this issue we estimate variants of difference-in-difference models allowing HC impacts to vary by levels of quality scores. We separately examine the effects of the three main scores (heart attack, heart failure, and combined mortalities) on transaction prices of two related cardiac procedures: bypass surgery and angioplasty. States which had mandated reporting systems preceding HC form the control group. Analyzing claims data of privately insured patients, we find that HC exerted downward pressure on prices, which we attribute to competitive pressures. However, hospitals ranked “above average” captured higher prices, thereby offsetting the overall policy effect. We conclude that HC was effective at constraining prices without penalizing high performers.

Source: Do Good Reports Mean Higher Prices? The Impact of Hospital Compare Ratings on Cardiac Pricing by Avi Dor, William E. Encinosa, Kathleen Carey :: SSRN


Do Certificate-of-Need Laws Limit Spending? by Matthew D. Mitchell :: SSRN

December 5, 2016

In 35 states, certificate-of-need (CON) laws in health care restrict the supply of medical services. These regulations require providers hoping to open a new healthcare facility, expand an existing facility, or purchase certain medical equipment such as an MRI machine or a hospital bed to first prove to a regulatory body that their community needs the service in question. The approval process can be time consuming and expensive, and it offers incumbent providers an opportunity to oppose the entrance of new competitors. However, it was originally hoped that these laws would, among other things, reduce healthcare price inflation. In this brief, I review the basic economic theory of a supply restriction like CON, then summarize four decades of empirical research on the effect of CON on healthcare spending. There is no evidence that CON regulations limit healthcare price inflation and little evidence that they reduce healthcare spending. In fact, the balance of evidence suggests that CON laws are associated with higher per-unit costs and higher total healthcare spending.

Source: Do Certificate-of-Need Laws Limit Spending? by Matthew D. Mitchell :: SSRN