Rewind the ACA court challenge tapes – AEI

July 11, 2019

But although the Democratic pro-ACA appellants cannot have been encouraged by the tone and scope of yesterday’s questioning, it remains a giant leap further ahead to envision a ruling that would overturn the entire ACA on nonseverable constitutional grounds. That’s just too much of a stretch, under standard severability analysis, to argue that the congressional findings of fact in 2010 actually intertwined the individual mandate with much more than a limited set of insurance-coverage-related ACA provisions (guaranteed issue, adjusted community rating, and perhaps minimum essential benefits at most). And even if the Fifth Circuit panel (or a later en banc review) decides to produce a scrambled mess, the Supreme Court and its chief umpire John Roberts (who has a tight strike zone for ACA legal challenges) remain poised to clean up Humpty Dumpty.

via Rewind the ACA court challenge tapes – AEI


The Future of the Affordable Care Act – National Constitution Center

April 5, 2019

Last week, the Department of Justice surprised many by reversing its position on the Affordable Care Act—stating that it agrees with U.S. District Judge Reed O’Connor that the ACA is unconstitutional, and won’t defend the law. Judge O’Connor’s December 2018 decision in Texas v. United States held that because the tax penalty that enforced the individual mandate had been reduced to $0 in Congress’s 2017 tax reforms, the rest of the ACA could not stand. The House of Representatives, along with several states, has intervened in the case to defend the ACA. Joining host Jeffrey Rosen to break down the case and the legal and constitutional arguments on both sides are ACA experts Abbe Gluck of Yale University and Tom Miller of the American Enterprise Institute.

via The Future of the Affordable Care Act – National Constitution Center


If The Court Strikes Down Obamacare, How Bad Would That Be? – Goodman Institute for Public Policy Research

April 5, 2019

The Trump administration has decided to challenge the constitutionality of the Affordable Care Act (Obamacare) in court. Some Republicans in Congress and even some in the administration resisted this decision. Critics assume that if there is no Obamacare, we would revert to the pre-Obamacare health system. If so, how bad would that be?

via If The Court Strikes Down Obamacare, How Bad Would That Be? – Goodman Institute for Public Policy Research


What Happens if Obamacare Is Struck Down? – The New York Times

April 5, 2019

“The Affordable Care Act touches the lives of most Americans. Some 21 million could lose health insurance if the Trump administration were to succeed in having the law ruled unconstitutional.”

via What Happens if Obamacare Is Struck Down? – The New York Times

Editor’s note: this article summarizes what Obamacare critic John Goodman has characterized as “Democratic talking points.” That said, it is a useful codification (and quantification) of the key concerns the law’s defenders have about its potential demise.


AEI Event | Sense and severability: If one part of the Affordable Care Act is ruled unconstitutional, what is the proper remedy or resolution?

February 16, 2019

On December 14, a federal district court in Texas ruled that the current version of the Affordable Care Act’s (ACA) individual mandate was unconstitutional. This is a link to two panel discussions on the often-overlooked law of severability and what might happen to the rest of the ACA if that finding holds up on appeal.The first panel discussed the current state of severability, how consistently it is applied, and whether there are possible alternatives that could improve it. The second panel discussed how severability law should be applied properly as this case advances. If an appellate court upholds the district court decision on constitutional issues, it still must decide what to do next. The primary options including striking down only the individual mandate (full severability), severing other functionally linked ACA insurance regulation provisions (partial severability), and finding that the entire ACA cannot be sustained.

Source: Sense and severability: If one part of the Affordable Care Act is ruled unconstitutional, what is the proper remedy or resolution?


After All These Years, Lochner Was Not Crazy — It Was Good by Randy E. Barnett :: SSRN

January 2, 2019

For this year’s Rosenkranz Debate, we have been asked to debate the question: Lochner v. New York: Still Crazy After All These Years? It is my job to defend the “negative” position. My burden is not to establish that Lochner was correctly decided, but merely that it was not “crazy.” I intend to meet that burden and exceed it. I intend to show how Lochner v. New York was not at all crazy; in fact, it was a reasonable and good decision.

via After All These Years, Lochner Was Not Crazy — It Was Good by Randy E. Barnett :: SSRN


Substantial Shifts in Supreme Court Health Law Jurisprudence by Lawrence O. Gostin, James G. Hodge :: SSRN

October 18, 2018

President Trump’s nomination of jurist Brett Kavanaugh to the U.S. Supreme Court presents significant, potential changes on health law and policy issues. If confirmed by the U.S. Senate, Kavanaugh’s approaches as a federal appellate court judge and scholar could literally shift the Court’s balance on consequential health policies. Judge Kavanaugh has disavowed broad discretion for federal agency authorities, cast significant doubts on the constitutionality of the Affordable Care Act, and narrowly interpreted reproductive rights (most notably abortion services). He has supported gun rights pursuant to the Second Amendment beyond U.S. Supreme Court recent interpretations. His varying positions related to consumer protections, environmental regulation, and antidiscrimination protections lend further to major concerns on the maintenance of settled positions of the Court on these and other critical health issues.

via Substantial Shifts in Supreme Court Health Law Jurisprudence by Lawrence O. Gostin, James G. Hodge :: SSRN