Identifying The Use, Cost, and Quality Tradeoff in the Medicare Hospice Benefit | HCFO

April 25, 2011

The researchers will assess the relationship between use, quality and cost of palliative care across the settings in which this care is delivered, including community-base palliative care, hospital-based palliative care, community-based hospice, and inpatient hospice.

More at Identifying The Use, Cost, and Quality Tradeoff in the Medicare Hospice Benefit | HCFO.


Impact of a Tiered Physician Network on Consumer Behavior | HCFO

December 17, 2010

The researchers will examine the effects of tiered physician networks introduced in six health plans offered to beneficiaries of the Massachusetts Group Insurance Commission (GIC). Specifically, they will (1) determine whether tier status of a regular physician is associated with choice of plan; (2) determine whether tier status affects the probability that a patient will visit a physician for the first time; (3) determine whether tier status affects the probability that a patient will continue seeking care with a physician seen prior to tiering; and (4) identify patient, plan, and physician characteristics associated with greater responsiveness on aims 1-3. The objective of this project is to assist employers in assessing the impact of physician tiering on consumer behavior and to assess the value of this benefit design feature.

More at Impact of a Tiered Physician Network on Consumer Behavior | HCFO.


Analyzing the Impact of the Medical Loss Ratio Under Health Reform on the Individual Market for Coverage in Each State | HCFO

December 17, 2010

Using data from the NAIC, the researchers will (1) estimate the number of individual market insurers in each state that, based on current business operations, will likely not meet a PPACA-mandated minimum 80 percent medical loss ratio (MLR) threshold, (2) estimate the corresponding number of enrollees served by these insurers, (3) analyze volatility in member months, premiums per member per month (PMPM), claims PMPM, and MLRs within states for 2001-2009 in order to establish a baseline for individual market functioning prior to MLR implementation, and (4) document the strengths and weaknesses of the NAIC data as a tool for predicting the impact of the minimum MLR requirement in each state on market stability. The purpose of this project is to estimate the potential impact of the minimum 80 percent MLR on insurers and enrollees in the individual market in each state.

More at Analyzing the Impact of the Medical Loss Ratio Under Health Reform on the Individual Market for Coverage in Each State | HCFO.


New Grant | The Impact of Retail Clinics on Overall Utilization of Care | HCFO

December 17, 2010

The researchers propose to examine the impact of retail health clinics on health care utilization and costs. Specifically, they will assess whether the entry of retail health clinics into a community is associated with a change in the overall utilization of retail-clinic sensitive conditions—eight simple acute care conditions that make up the majority of retail health clinic visits—and will estimate the impact on costs of the entry of retail clinics. The researchers hypothesize that retail health clinic utilization could substitute for emergency department and physician office utilization, thus decreasing costs, or encourage utilization by those who would otherwise stay at home, thus increasing costs. The objective of this study is to shed light on the potential benefits and drawbacks of policies that encourage retail clinic use.

More at The Impact of Retail Clinics on Overall Utilization of Care | HCFO.


Health Affairs | A Philanthropy Tackles Growth In Health Costs At The State Level

July 7, 2010

David Sandman and Anthony Kovner. A Philanthropy Tackles Growth In Health Costs At The State Level, Health Affairs, July 2010; 29(7): 1411-1414.[Full Text (pdf)]

Abstract. Slowing the rate of growth of health spending is as critical a goal at the state level as it is at the national level. Philanthropy can hardly address this issue alone, yet it has an obligation to take on big and seemingly intractable problems. The New York State Health Foundation is committed to stimulating innovative and replicable approaches to bending the cost curve. This article describes how the foundation recently awarded six grants to support efforts related to payment reform, hospital readmissions, medical malpractice reform, palliative care, and the quantification of other cost containment approaches that could be pursued at the state level.

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CDC Funds the Center on Alcohol Marketing and Youth at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

August 20, 2009

The Center on Alcohol Marketing and Youth at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health was awarded $4 million in funding from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion to monitor youth exposure to alcohol advertising over the next five years. Source: CDC Funds the Center on Alcohol Marketing and Youth at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.