CMS Office of the Actuary Releases 2016 National Health Expenditures

December 6, 2017

In 2016, overall national health spending increased 4.3 percent following 5.8 percent growth in 2015, according to a study by the Office of the Actuary at the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) published today as a Web First by Health Affairs. Following Affordable Care Act (ACA) coverage expansion and significant retail prescription drug spending growth in 2014 and 2015, health care spending growth decelerated in 2016. The report concludes that the 2016 expenditure slowdown was broadly based as growth for all major payers (private health insurance, Medicare, and Medicaid) and goods and service categories (hospitals, physician and clinical services, and retail prescription drugs) slowed in 2016.

via CMS Office of the Actuary Releases 2016 National Health Expenditures


Why Do Americans Spend so Much More on Health Care than Europeans? A General Equilibrium Macroeconomic Analysis by Hui He, Kevin Huang :: SSRN

March 18, 2013

Empirical evidence suggests that both leisure time and medical care are important for maintaining health. We develop a general equilibrium macroeconomic model in which taxation is a key determinant of the composition of these two inputs in the endogenous accumulation of health capital. In our model, higher taxes lead to using relatively more leisure time and less medical care in maintaining health. We find that the difference in taxation can account for a large fraction of the difference in health expenditure-GDP ratio and almost all of the difference in time input for health production between the US and Europe.

via Why Do Americans Spend so Much More on Health Care than Europeans? A General Equilibrium Macroeconomic Analysis by Hui He, Kevin Huang :: SSRN.


Insights from Monthly NationalAltarum Institute | Health Expenditure Estimates through January 2013

March 14, 2013

The health spending share of GDP was 18.0% in December 2012, up from 16.4% at the start of the recession in December 2007. This increase is partly attributable to slow GDP growth rather than high health spending growth, as the December 2012 health spending share of potential GDP (PGDP) was 17.0%.

 


On the Relationship between GDP and Health Care Expenditure: A New Perspective by Santiago Lago-Penas, David Cantarero, Carla Blázquez :: SSRN

May 31, 2012

In this paper we analyze the relationship between income and health expenditure in 31 OECD countries. We focus on the difference between short and long term multipliers and we also check the adjustment process of health care expenditure to changes in per capita GDP and its main components. In both cases we test if results differ in countries with a higher share of private expenditure on total health expenditure. Econometric results show that the long-run multiplier is close to unity, that health expenditure is more sensitive to per capita income cyclical movements than to trend movements, and that those countries with a higher share of private health expenditure fit faster and following a different pattern.

via On the Relationship between GDP and Health Care Expenditure: A New Perspective by Santiago Lago-Penas, David Cantarero, Carla Blázquez :: SSRN.


Health Care 101: The truth about health spending in America – Health – AEI

March 26, 2012

A leading driver of President Obama’s health reform was the conviction that America’s health economy was badly broken. Even critics of Obamacare largely agreed that Americans spend too much on, and get too little from, their health care. The talking points told one story, but the statistics tell another. In this “Health Care 101” guide, Christopher J. Conover, author of the just-released “American Health Economy Illustrated,” distinguishes fact from fiction and answers some of the most fundamental questions about health care and health spending in America.

via Health Care 101: The truth about health spending in America – Health – AEI.


Major Trends in the U.S. Health Economy since 1950 — NEJM

March 15, 2012

Rapid advances in medical science and technology, substantial gains in health outcomes attributable to medical care, and budget-busting increases in health care expenditures fueled by private and public insurance have marked the past six decades of health care in the United States. As the country struggles to emerge from a multiyear financial and economic crisis, policymakers and the public have increasingly homed in on those skyrocketing health care expenditures. What lessons can be drawn from the evolution, since 1950, in the sources of payment and objects of expenditures in the health care arena?

via Major Trends in the U.S. Health Economy since 1950 — NEJM.


Our skyrocketing health care costs, in one chart – The Washington Post

November 16, 2011

This chart comes from the Commonwealth Fund’s annual report, out today, comparing health spending and outcomes in 11 industrialized countries. The United States by far has the highest spending per capita, at $7,960 per person. None of the other ten, industrialized countries in the survey even come close: Norway, which has the next highest spending, hovers around $5,352.

via Our skyrocketing health care costs, in one chart – The Washington Post.