The Future of the Affordable Care Act – National Constitution Center

April 5, 2019

Last week, the Department of Justice surprised many by reversing its position on the Affordable Care Act—stating that it agrees with U.S. District Judge Reed O’Connor that the ACA is unconstitutional, and won’t defend the law. Judge O’Connor’s December 2018 decision in Texas v. United States held that because the tax penalty that enforced the individual mandate had been reduced to $0 in Congress’s 2017 tax reforms, the rest of the ACA could not stand. The House of Representatives, along with several states, has intervened in the case to defend the ACA. Joining host Jeffrey Rosen to break down the case and the legal and constitutional arguments on both sides are ACA experts Abbe Gluck of Yale University and Tom Miller of the American Enterprise Institute.

via The Future of the Affordable Care Act – National Constitution Center


If The Court Strikes Down Obamacare, How Bad Would That Be? – Goodman Institute for Public Policy Research

April 5, 2019

The Trump administration has decided to challenge the constitutionality of the Affordable Care Act (Obamacare) in court. Some Republicans in Congress and even some in the administration resisted this decision. Critics assume that if there is no Obamacare, we would revert to the pre-Obamacare health system. If so, how bad would that be?

via If The Court Strikes Down Obamacare, How Bad Would That Be? – Goodman Institute for Public Policy Research


What Happens if Obamacare Is Struck Down? – The New York Times

April 5, 2019

“The Affordable Care Act touches the lives of most Americans. Some 21 million could lose health insurance if the Trump administration were to succeed in having the law ruled unconstitutional.”

via What Happens if Obamacare Is Struck Down? – The New York Times

Editor’s note: this article summarizes what Obamacare critic John Goodman has characterized as “Democratic talking points.” That said, it is a useful codification (and quantification) of the key concerns the law’s defenders have about its potential demise.