Resetting the Scoreboard: Why CBO Should Abandon Its Flawed Analysis of the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation

Executive Summary
Congress created the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation (CMMI) in the Affordable Care Act and vested it with extraordinary powers. CMMI can conduct demonstration projects in the Medicare, Medicaid and Children’s Health Insurance Program and expand those projects nationwide without congressional approval.
The Congressional Budget Office (CBO) believes that CMMI will achieve substantial federal savings. It bases this conclusion not on analyses of projects that CMMI has undertaken, but on faith in the CMMI process. CBO assumes that process will produce money-saving ideas and that the center will scrap failed projects and expand
successful ones.

“The savings that CBO expects to result from the center’s activities,” a senior CBO official said in congressional testimony, “stem largely from the judgment that successful demonstrations will be expanded and achieve savings.”
The statement’s circularity – CBO “expects” CMMI to achieve savings because CMMI will “achieve savings” – is but one way which the agency’s analysis of CMMI departs from its long-established methods of preparing estimates. In addition to assuming that CMMI will sometime in the future conceive, launch and nationalize successful projects, CBO conjured a numerical factor to convert its assumptions into dollar estimates. It then embedded these numbers in its Medicare baseline, the yardstick against which it measures legislation.

CBO’s unique approach to CMMI thus colors its analysis of legislation designed to achieve Medicare savings. CBO believes that any bill that would overlap with any ongoing or possible future CMMI demonstration would increase Medicare spending above baseline levels. Even if Congress offers up a proposal that would reduce spending relative to the statute, CBO will score it as a spending hike if it believes that CMMI might someday test a similar policy.
CBO thus ascribes unobserved and unobservable savings to projects that CMMI has not yet undertaken (and may never undertake), quantifies these savings through the application of an arbitrary numerical factor, incorporates the savings into its Medicare baseline, and measures the budgetary effects of legislation against this revised baseline.

This paper traces the history of Medicare demonstration projects and shows how CMMI’s authorities differ from its predecessors. It then examines CBO’s assumptions about CMMI, carefully tracing the reasoning that has led to its conclusions. It then shows how recent events, including the Trump Administration’s cancellation of CMMI projects that CBO believed would save money, expose flaws in CBO’s assumptions and reasoning. It concludes with recommendations for CBO, Congress and the executive branch with respect to CMMI.

via https://www.ntu.org/library/doclib/Why-CBO-Should-Abandon-Its-Flawed-Analysis-of-the.pdf

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