New Gruber Study Raises Major Questions About ACA’s Medicaid Expansion | Mercatus Center

November 30, 2016

A new study by Jonathan Gruber, one of the Affordable Care Act’s (ACA) chief economic architects, suggests that roughly two-thirds of new Medicaid enrollees in 2014 were eligible for the program under previous state eligibility criteria—meaning that they were not made eligible by the ACA. If accurate, then a much smaller share of new Medicaid enrollees were made eligible for the program by the ACA than Washington experts commonly believe. For example, the Congressional Budget Office’s (CBO) most recent projection is that only one of six new Medicaid enrollees were eligible for the program before the ACA.

Source: New Gruber Study Raises Major Questions About ACA’s Medicaid Expansion | Mercatus Center

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Hundreds on Medicaid waiting list in Illinois die while waiting for care | Illinois Policy | Illinois’ comeback story starts here

November 25, 2016

The state’s most recent enrollment reports show more than 650,000 able-bodied adults have enrolled in Medicaid since the Obamacare expansion, and this enrollment shows no sign of slowing down. This is nearly twice as many adults as the state said would ever enroll and more than the state said would ever even be eligible.

Expansion costs are also significantly over projections. Despite promises from the administration of former Gov. Pat Quinn that total expansion costs would “only” hit $2.7 billion in the first two years, costs actually came in at $4.7 billion – 70 percent higher than promised.

Source: Hundreds on Medicaid waiting list in Illinois die while waiting for care | Illinois Policy | Illinois’ comeback story starts here


Knowledge About Health Insurance and Finance Linked to Higher Rates of Health Coverage | RAND

November 25, 2016

Uninsured individuals who had greater knowledge about health insurance and financial issues were more likely to gain coverage after health insurance exchanges opened under the federal Affordable Care Act, according to a new RAND Corporation study.For a typical person who was uninsured in 2013, the chance of being insured in 2015 was 9.2 percentage points higher if they had high health insurance literacy as compared to someone with low health insurance literacy, after adjusting for other factors.

Source: Knowledge About Health Insurance and Finance Linked to Higher Rates of Health Coverage | RAND


A Taxpayer Bailout of ACA Insurers Just Got a Lot More Expensive | Mercatus Center

November 25, 2016

The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) finally released the 2015 Affordable Care Act (ACA) risk corridor data. The data show the rapid deterioration of the ACA exchanges from 2014 to 2015.

The ACA’s risk corridor program was intended to transfer funds from profitable insurers to unprofitable ones for the first three years of the exchanges (2014 to 2016). The program ran a $2.5 billion deficit for the 2014 plan year as far more insurers incurred losses than made profits. In 2015, the deficit increased to more than $5.8 billion—a 132% increase.

Source: A Taxpayer Bailout of ACA Insurers Just Got a Lot More Expensive | Mercatus Center


Bridging Theory and Practice Leadership/Barack Obama by Hassan H. Elkatawneh :: SSRN

November 25, 2016

The paper discusses the style of leadership of the president of the United States of America President Barack Obama, during the eight years of working to achieve his promises to voters. The Obama presidential term has been characterized by great tensions serious events, crisis, overlapping changes at both internal and external levels, in addition, a heavy legacy of economic and security problems. The paper shows how Obama’s leadership style influenced by personal characteristics, and that had an impact on some cases to acquire support and sometimes on the face of fierce opposition, especially from the vanguard political classes. The paper touched Leadership Theories and Behavioral Theories to discuss of President Obama’s leadership style. Where the largest share of the study was to Traits Theory and the Transformational Leadership Theory, with the aid of the Behavioral Theories in analyzing the personal behavior and leadership style of President Obama. The study tries to bridge between theory and practice in harmonizing behaviors and theoretical assumptions, using the Behavioral Theories. When the study found that the transformational leader personality is not enough to earn the necessary support unless the personality of the transformational leader involves a democratic behavior.

Source: Bridging Theory and Practice Leadership/Barack Obama by Hassan H. Elkatawneh :: SSRN


American Healthcare Rackets: Monopolies, Oligopolies, Cartels and Kindred Plunderbunds | THCB

November 25, 2016

The FDA is the object lesson I’ve focused on. But there is a wealth of object lessons all with their distinctive acronym: ACGME, ABIM, AHA, ABMS, ACS, CMS (MIPS, MACRA), HIPAA and there are many more in the alphabet soup. Others are known by their full name like The Joint Commission, a non-governmental agency that wields accreditation with power and authority causing some 20,000 health organization, particularly hospitals, to cringe and comply.  Acronym or not, all these bearers of standards beg critical analysis. All have regulatory influence and all have fallen victim to regulatory capture to some degree.

Source: American Healthcare Rackets: Monopolies, Oligopolies, Cartels and Kindred Plunderbunds | THCB


Health Care and the Housing Crisis by Ben Gilbert, Julian Wade :: SSRN

November 24, 2016

We show that the percentage of people in a county without health insurance in 2005 is a strong and robust predictor of subsequent home value declines in that county during the housing crisis. Our preferred estimates indicate that a 10 percentage point increase in uninsured county residents in 2005 is associated with approximately 4 additional percentage points of home value decline between 2006 and 2010. We also provide evidence that this relationship was essentially nonexistent in Massachussets, where comprehensive health care reform was passed just before the housing crisis began. Our results contribute to the growing literature on the financial benefits of obtaining health insurance, but we are the first to show a link between health insurance and housing market outcomes. We also add to the literature on the household-level determinants of the recession; considering that uninsured households are likely to pay medical debt with consumer credit or home equity loans, our results shed light on one mechanism by which pre-recession household leverage may have exacerbated the recession. These results have important policy implications as the federal government considers a revision of the Affordable Care Act.

Source: Health Care and the Housing Crisis by Ben Gilbert, Julian Wade :: SSRN