Obamacare’s Slush Fund Fuels A Broader Lobbying Controversy – Forbes

May 31, 2013

A little-noticed part of President Obama’s Affordable Care Act channels some $12.5 billion into a vaguely defined “Prevention and Public Health Fund” over the next decade–and some of that money is going for everything from massage therapists who offer “calming techniques,” to groups advocating higher state and local taxes on tobacco and soda, and stricter zoning restrictions on fast-food restaurants.

via Obamacare’s Slush Fund Fuels A Broader Lobbying Controversy – Forbes.

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Variation In Medicare Costs Is Mainly Due To Post-Acute Care – Forbes

May 31, 2013

If we want to control Medicare spending, this analysis suggests we need to focus our efforts on post-acute care. Our obsession with hospital costs and physician bills may be misplaced. It could be time to look much more closely at things like the nursing home industry, the home healthcare industry, and places that specialize in long-term care.

via Variation In Medicare Costs Is Mainly Due To Post-Acute Care – Forbes.


A hidden tax in Obamacare – latimes.com

May 31, 2013

The central provisions of the Affordable Care Act require younger and healthier Americans to buy insurance policies that will, in essence, subsidize the healthcare of older and sicker Americans. But one of Obamacares hidden taxes — a new limit on contributions to health flexible spending accounts, or FSAs — will hit older and chronically ill individuals hardest.Starting this year, the healthcare law imposes a $2,500 annual cap on an individuals contribution to an FSA that is part of an employers “cafeteria” benefits plan. Such contributions, diverted directly from ones paycheck, are not subject to federal income and payroll taxes. The money in an FSA can then be used to pay for qualified medical expenses such as deductibles, co-insurance and co-payments, as well as services not covered by insurance.

via A hidden tax in Obamacare – latimes.com.


Doctors should discuss financial concerns of cancer patients – DukeHealth.org

May 30, 2013

Most cancer patients would like to talk about the cost of their care with their doctors, but often don’t because they fear the discussion could compromise the quality of their treatment, researchers at Duke Cancer Institute report.

Yet many patients who do broach the subject of finances believe it helps decrease costs.

Those findings, from a survey of 300 insured patients treated at Duke and affiliated clinics in rural North Carolina, suggest that doctors can play a role in easing financial worries just by taking the problem into account.

via Doctors should discuss financial concerns of cancer patients – DukeHealth.org.


Eyelid lifts for Medicare patients cost taxpayers millions – Florida – MiamiHerald.com

May 29, 2013

Aging Americans worried about their droopy upper eyelids often rely on the plastic surgeon’s scalpel to turn back the hands of time. Increasingly, Medicare is footing the bill.

Yes, Medicare. The public health insurance program for people over 65 typically does not cover cosmetic surgery, but for cases in which a patient’s sagging eyelids significantly hinder their vision, it does pay to have them lifted. In recent years, though, a rapid rise in the number of so-called functional eyelid lifts, or blepharoplasty, has led some to question whether Medicare is letting procedures that are really cosmetic slip through the cracks — at a cost of millions of dollars.

via Eyelid lifts for Medicare patients cost taxpayers millions – Florida – MiamiHerald.com.


Medicare Spending Variations Mostly Due To Health Differences, Study Concludes – Kaiser Health News

May 29, 2013

The idea that uneven Medicare health care spending around the country is due to wasteful practices and overtreatment—a concept that influenced the federal health law — takes another hit in a study published Tuesday. The paper concludes that health differences around the country explain between 75 percent and 85 percent of the cost variations.

via Medicare Spending Variations Mostly Due To Health Differences, Study Concludes – Kaiser Health News.


Navigating the ObamaCare Maze: Newsroom: The Independent Institute

May 29, 2013

One problem is that too little money was budgeted for creating the exchanges, which are the online markets where people can choose among competing health plans and prices. It is also where those with income below a set ceiling—for example, up to $94,200 for a family of four—will be entitled to buy insurance at subsidized prices.

The Congressional Budget Office originally estimated that setting up the exchanges would cost between $5 billion and $10 billion. California alone is spending more than $900 million, yet the health-reform law allocated only $1 billion for the country as a whole. The Obama administration has been cannibalizing other federal health budgets in a mad rush to find more for the exchanges.

A second problem is complexity. The Obama administration wants something the federal government has never done: a computer system that connects HHS, the Internal Revenue Service, the Social Security Administration, Homeland Security and perhaps other departments. This is a herculean task with unclear benefits.

via Navigating the ObamaCare Maze: Newsroom: The Independent Institute.