NHS nurses stretched to breaking point, says report | Society | theguardian.com

April 14, 2014

“Despite all the government rhetoric, despite the Francis, Keogh and Cavendish reports, the spectre of another Mid Staffs still looms large over the NHS. Progress on safe staffing levels has been glacial and that means poorer care and patients still at risk.

“It’s clear that despite nurses working through breaks and beyond their hours, they simply do not have enough time to give patients the care and attention they need. That is distressing for patients and for the staff trying to care for them.

“The government needs to face up to the damage it is inflicting on patients and staff, by not introducing legally enforceable nurse-to-patient ratios, and take urgent action.”

via NHS nurses stretched to breaking point, says report | Society | theguardian.com.


Book review: *The American Health Care Paradox* | The Incidental Economist

March 20, 2014

One thing Lowrey didn’t mention, however, was the link between the social determinants of health (which often correlate with geography) and healthcare costs. That’s where The American Health Care Paradox, a new book by Elizabeth H. Bradley and Lauren A. Taylor, comes in.

TAHCP aims to shed light on the titular paradox, familiar to readers of this blog—why does America get such poor health outcomes, given the staggering amount spent on healthcare? It turns out that Bradley and Taylor don’t think America’s spending too much on improving health—it’s that it’s spending on the wrong things.

via Book review: *The American Health Care Paradox* | The Incidental Economist.


A conservative case for universal coverage | WashingtonExaminer.com

January 19, 2014

The good news is that we don’t have to theorize about unproven solutions to our health care problems. Two wealthy countries have health care systems that, if we could substitute them for our own, would exceed the wildest dreams of American conservative reformers. Switzerland and Singapore achieve universal coverage while spending a fraction of what we spend, and they ensure broad access to high-quality doctors and the latest technology.

via A conservative case for universal coverage | WashingtonExaminer.com.


National Health SHAMBLES: Three damning reports describe mothers abandoned during labour, serious hospital blunders every day and how patients have lost faith in their GPs | Mail Online

December 16, 2013

Three damning reports last night laid bare the crisis in NHS hospitals, maternity units and GP surgeries.One investigation revealed that a quarter of new mothers were abandoned by their midwives during labour, with some left to give birth on the floor or in corridors.The second found that mistakes deemed so serious they should never happen are being made in hospitals five times a week.And the third survey said thousands of patients have all but given up trying to secure appointments with their family doctor.

via National Health SHAMBLES: Three damning reports describe mothers abandoned during labour, serious hospital blunders every day and how patients have lost faith in their GPs | Mail Online.


Finns flock to Estonian private health care | Yle Uutiset | yle.fi

December 9, 2013

Because of long queues for surgery and expensive private health care at home, more and more Finns are turning to private hospitals in Estonia. However, in cases of malpractice, seeking compensation may prove difficult.

via Finns flock to Estonian private health care | Yle Uutiset | yle.fi.


Hate to (Br)eak it to You Walt, But it’s Pretty (Ba)d in Canada, Too — The American Magazine

October 19, 2013

In fact, Canada has one of the lowest physician-to-population ratios in the developed world. Add fixed hospital budgets and the monopolization of health insurance by the government, and you get a universal access health care system that also fails to provide access to services in a timely manner. The most recent annual survey of wait times in Canada revealed that patients have to wait approximately four and a half months on average to receive treatment for medically necessary elective procedures after referral from a general practitioner (whom many Canadians also have a hard time finding). While the wait is shorter for cancer patients (about a month), we also have to remember the long wait patients face for access to diagnostic imaging technologies like MRIs (over two months on average) and CT scanners (almost a month on average) which are vital for assisting in making the diagnosis in the first place. Such delays can have large impacts on cancer patients given the possibility that the size of a cancerous tumor doubles every four months.

via Hate to (Br)eak it to You Walt, But it’s Pretty (Ba)d in Canada, Too — The American Magazine.


Irish Doctors Strike to Protest Work Hours – WSJ.com

October 9, 2013

The medical organization said the doctors are routinely required to be available for work for stretches of as many as 36 hours straight, and can work 100 hours a week, breaching European employment law and putting patients\’ safety at risk.

The government doesn\’t dispute that some of the shifts may violate European law, and has been in negotiations with the IMO for more than two years to identify ways to reduce hours.

via Irish Doctors Strike to Protest Work Hours – WSJ.com.


Health emergency: On eve of Obamacare, Britain’s NHS needs political therapy | WashingtonExaminer.com

October 8, 2013

One of the more recent scandals has its roots in the 1990s, when the NHS established a set of best practices for providing care to patients at the end of their lives. Known as the Liverpool Care Pathway, it has since been applied to hundreds of thousands of people. Last November, the Mail reported, an independent review found that 60,000 people were put on the pathway without their consent and a third of the time families weren\’t even informed. Thus, they had no idea that their close relatives were removed from life support equipment and were being denied nourishment. In extreme cases, nurses shouted at relatives who attempted to give their dying loved ones sips of water. According to the Mail, hospitals were given incentive payments for putting more people on the pathway – effectively, the government was providing bonuses for ending people\’s lives earlier.

In July, the government said it would phase out the pathway after its own review concluded, “Caring for the dying must never again be practiced as a tick-box exercise and each patient must be cared for according to their individual needs.”

via Health emergency: On eve of Obamacare, Britain’s NHS needs political therapy | WashingtonExaminer.com.


About Singapore… | The Incidental Economist

August 22, 2013

Just a few days ago, I wrote about how Singapore has been a go-to for many of my move conservative colleagues, who think it’s a much more market friendly alternative to the ACA. I think that many of them underestimate how much “government” there is in the system. Today, all that is a bit irrelevant, because Singapore announced that however much government is involved, it’s not nearly enough (emphasis mine):

via About Singapore… | The Incidental Economist.


Health in the U.S. and other rich countries: We pay more in health care but are sicker. – Slate Magazine

July 24, 2013

Our health depends on much more than just medical care. Behaviors such as diet, physical activity, and even how fast we drive all have profound effects. So do the environments that expose us to health risks or discourage healthy living, as well as social determinants of health, such as education, income, and poverty.

The United States fares poorly in almost all of these. In addition to many millions of people lacking health insurance, financial barriers to care, and a lack of primary care providers compared with other rich countries, people in the United States consume more calories, are more sedentary, abuse more drugs, and shoot one another more often. The United States also lags behind on many measures of education, has higher child poverty and income inequality, and lower social mobility than most other advanced democracies.

via Health in the U.S. and other rich countries: We pay more in health care but are sicker. – Slate Magazine.


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